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Shoes and Craft

A shoemaker's blog about shoemaking

I received a pair of boots, which – frankly – I just bought because of the trees, that were included in the ridiculously cheap price. I put them aside, as I didn’t have time to start making boots now, and left them there. Until now. To tell the truth, I wanted to disassemble them, but I just couldn’t. They are too perfect. From the details, a whole story unfolded in front of my eyes, but not necessarily a true one.

Let’s start with this pic. It shows something, that really surprised me – that stitch wasn’t done with machine. Usually these stitches are handmade, so that’s why I examine them closely, as they were too perfect for hand stitches. But they are.

Well, this speaks for itself. I haven’t seen any Hungarian boots or shoes with this type of metal toe tap.

Another beautiful detail. The whole vamp is stitched with a reverse stitch, and it turns to an overlapping piece before the quarter. I can hardly believe that this can be done this nicely with a machine. By the way, this stitch goes all the way up to the backline.

Here it is – look at those impeccable little stitches.

Long side – typical for English style (I am not talking necessarily English made riding boots).

Long heels, pegged shank (and all around stitched).

And an interesting finish – long heel with straight heel breast. Hungarian makers usually make it slightly rounded (outside, so it is more durable)

Heel edge – a little bit rounded. Easier to repair, more durable. Typical bootmaker technique.

Lining backline – amazing details here too. 10 cm from the top is reverse stitch for hiding the stitch, then side to side for comfort. Small, almost invisible details, but nice.

Look at those tiny, but perfect details with the decoration wheel! By the way, did you realize that the heel front is perfectly matching the vamp-quarter line? And… as a practitioner shoemaker, I can tell you: making decorative wheel prints is unbelievably difficult. There must be a few dozen pairs of practice behind it.

And also here…

To bo continued…

(Don’t forget – I still owe you the story..)

ps. Do I want to reproduce this piece of history from the glorious time? For sure I do! Here is the pattern!

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